Famous Soviet and Russian spies

Since the days of the Cold War, dozens of scouts penetrated the state
Secrets of the United States, often acting boldly and brilliantly.






1. Ethel and Julius Rosenberg
In 1950, the infamous married couple was accused by the FBI in the transfer of nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. The trial of them received wide media coverage and fueled the Cold War. Many had doubts whether the guilty really spouses, especially Etel, but despite this couple has been subjected to capital punishment June 19, 1953 at Sing Sing, New York.




In 1950, the infamous married couple was accused by the FBI in the transfer of nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. The trial of them received wide media coverage and fueled the Cold War. Many had doubts whether the guilty really spouses, especially Etel, but despite this couple has been subjected to capital punishment June 19, 1953 at Sing Sing, New York. & Quot; title = «1. Ethel and Julius Rosenberg
In 1950, the infamous married couple was accused by the FBI in the transfer of nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. The trial of them received wide media coverage and fueled the Cold War. Many had doubts whether the guilty really spouses, especially Etel, but despite this couple has been subjected to capital punishment June 19, 1953 at Sing Sing, New York. »& Gt;

2. Lavrenty Beria
Beria was the head of the NKVD under Stalin. He is responsible for some party "cleansing" and the death of large numbers of people. In 1953, shortly after the American couple executed the Rosenbergs, he was accused of collaboration with the British intelligence and shot.




Beria was the head of the NKVD under Stalin. He is responsible for some party "cleansing" and the death of large numbers of people. In 1953, shortly after the American couple executed the Rosenbergs, he was accused of collaboration with the British intelligence and shot. & Quot; title = «2. Lavrenty Beria
Beria was the head of the NKVD under Stalin. He is responsible for some party "cleansing" and the death of large numbers of people. In 1953, shortly after the American couple executed the Rosenbergs, he was accused of collaboration with the British intelligence and shot. »& Gt;

3. Elizabeth Bentley
In 1938, Bentley began spying for the Nazis in New York in favor of the Communist Party of the United States, and through it - and for the Soviet Union. Later, she led two separate groups of scouts. In 1945, after a conflict with his leadership of Moscow, she went to the FBI and "handed over" more than 100 agents who made up its network.




In 1938, Bentley began spying for the Nazis in New York in favor of the Communist Party of the United States, and through it - and for the Soviet Union. Later, she led two separate groups of scouts. In 1945, after a conflict with his leadership of Moscow, she went to the FBI and "handed over" more than 100 agents who made up its network. & Quot; title = «3. Elizabeth Bentley
In 1938, Bentley began spying for the Nazis in New York in favor of the Communist Party of the United States, and through it - and for the Soviet Union. Later, she led two separate groups of scouts. In 1945, after a conflict with his leadership of Moscow, she went to the FBI and "handed over" more than 100 agents who made up its network. »& Gt;

4. Rudolf Abel
The famous Abel illegal act in the United States from 1947 to 1957, when it was disclosed after the failure of his assistant Reino Hayhanena. Abel (real name - William H. Fisher) and Hayhanen used hollow coins and other tricks to send messages and information. The collapse came when one of these coins drilled encrypted message accidentally fell into the hands of the boys - newsboy in Brooklyn. Abel was tried and sentenced to five years in prison, but in 1962 were exchanged for U2 pilot Gary Powers and an American student. After returning to the USSR Abel was revered as a hero and awarded the Order of Lenin - the highest award of the Soviet Union.




The famous Abel illegal act in the United States from 1947 to 1957, when it was disclosed after the failure of his assistant Reino Hayhanena. Abel (real name - William H. Fisher) and Hayhanen used hollow coins and other tricks to send messages and information. The collapse came when one of these coins drilled encrypted message accidentally fell into the hands of the boys - newsboy in Brooklyn. Abel was tried and sentenced to five years in prison, but in 1962 were exchanged for U2 pilot Gary Powers and an American student. After returning to the USSR Abel was revered as a hero and awarded the Order of Lenin - the highest award of the Soviet Union. & Quot; title = «4. Rudolf Abel
The famous Abel illegal act in the United States from 1947 to 1957, when it was disclosed after the failure of his assistant Reino Hayhanena. Abel (real name - William H. Fisher) and Hayhanen used hollow coins and other tricks to send messages and information. The collapse came when one of these coins drilled encrypted message accidentally fell into the hands of the boys - newsboy in Brooklyn. Abel was tried and sentenced to five years in prison, but in 1962 were exchanged for U2 pilot Gary Powers and an American student. After returning to the USSR Abel was revered as a hero and awarded the Order of Lenin - the highest award of the Soviet Union. »& Gt;

5. Kim Philby
In 1941, Philby went to work in British intelligence, MI6, despite the fact that he was a Soviet spy in 1933. The British realized that he leads a double game in 1963. For twenty years in MI6 Philby had to get high rank and position, and pass to the right place as a top-secret information as he could. Philby escaped to the USSR, where he lived the rest of his life in high esteem, Hero of the Soviet Union. He died in 1988



In 1941, Philby went to work in British intelligence, MI6, despite the fact that he was a Soviet spy in 1933. The British realized that he leads a double game in 1963. For twenty years in MI6 Philby had to get high rank and position, and pass to the right place as a top-secret information as he could. Philby escaped to the USSR, where he lived the rest of his life in high esteem, Hero of the Soviet Union. He died in 1988, & quot; title = «5. Kim Philby
In 1941, Philby went to work in British intelligence, MI6, despite the fact that he was a Soviet spy in 1933. The British realized that he leads a double game in 1963. For twenty years in MI6 Philby had to get high rank and position, and pass to the right place as a top-secret information as he could. Philby escaped to the USSR, where he lived the rest of his life in high esteem, Hero of the Soviet Union. He died in 1988. »& Gt;

6. Anthony Blunt
Member of the infamous Cambridge Five (which consisted of Kim Philby), Blunt passed secret information to the Soviet Union during the Second World War, when he served in MI5. Blunt confessed in secret to the British in 1964, and the fact of his cooperation with the Soviet Union remained a state secret until 1979, when Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher publicly dismissed him as Queen Elizabeth II stripped of his knighthood.



Member of the infamous Cambridge Five (which consisted of Kim Philby), Blunt passed secret information to the Soviet Union during the Second World War, when he served in MI5. Blunt confessed in secret to the British in 1964, and the fact of his cooperation with the Soviet Union remained a state secret until 1979, when Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher publicly dismissed him as Queen Elizabeth II stripped of his knighthood. & Quot; title = «6. Anthony Blunt
Member of the infamous Cambridge Five (which consisted of Kim Philby), Blunt passed secret information to the Soviet Union during the Second World War, when he served in MI5. Blunt confessed in secret to the British in 1964, and the fact of his cooperation with the Soviet Union remained a state secret until 1979, when Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher publicly dismissed him as Queen Elizabeth II stripped of his knighthood. »& Gt;

7.Morris and Lona Cohen
Husband and wife were born in the United States, and became Soviet spies in the late 30s. The center ordered them to freeze its activities after a threat of failure. A few years later they opened a second-hand bookshop in London under the pseudonym Helen and Peter Kroger. The couple were arrested in 1961 for communication with a group of Portland Spy Circle (Portland Spy Ring), and in 1969. released in exchange for Gerald Brooke - British citizen who was detained in the Soviet Union. On arrival in the USSR, the couple were awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and participated in the preparation of the new intelligence.



Husband and wife were born in the United States, and became Soviet spies in the late 30s. The center ordered them to freeze its activities after a threat of failure. A few years later they opened a second-hand bookshop in London under the pseudonym Helen and Peter Kroger. The couple were arrested in 1961 for communication with a group of Portland Spy Circle (Portland Spy Ring), and in 1969. released in exchange for Gerald Brooke - British citizen who was detained in the Soviet Union. On arrival in the USSR, the couple were awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and participated in the preparation of the new intelligence. & Quot; title = «7.Morris and Lona Cohen
Husband and wife were born in the United States, and became Soviet spies in the late 30s. The center ordered them to freeze its activities after a threat of failure. A few years later they opened a second-hand bookshop in London under the pseudonym Helen and Peter Kroger. The couple were arrested in 1961 for communication with a group of Portland Spy Circle (Portland Spy Ring), and in 1969. released in exchange for Gerald Brooke - British citizen who was detained in the Soviet Union. On arrival in the USSR, the couple were awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and participated in the preparation of the new intelligence. »& Gt;

8. Christopher Boyce
Boyce, a prototype of the famous novel by Robert Lindsay "Falcon and the Snowman" and the eponymous film, passed information to the Soviets through his friend Andrew Dalton Lee. Boyce was arrested in 1977 after Lee tied directly in front of the Soviet Embassy in Mexico. After escaping from prison in 1980, Boyce looted banks and planned to flee to the Soviet Union. He was arrested again in 1981. Boyce was released on bail in 2003.



Boyce, a prototype of the famous novel by Robert Lindsay "Falcon and the Snowman" and the eponymous film, passed information to the Soviets through his friend Andrew Dalton Lee. Boyce was arrested in 1977 after Lee tied directly in front of the Soviet Embassy in Mexico. After escaping from prison in 1980, Boyce looted banks and planned to flee to the Soviet Union. He was arrested again in 1981. Boyce was released on bail in 2003. & Quot; title = «8. Christopher Boyce
Boyce, a prototype of the famous novel by Robert Lindsay "Falcon and the Snowman" and the eponymous film, passed information to the Soviets through his friend Andrew Dalton Lee. Boyce was arrested in 1977 after Lee tied directly in front of the Soviet Embassy in Mexico. After escaping from prison in 1980, Boyce looted banks and planned to flee to the Soviet Union. He was arrested again in 1981. Boyce was released on bail in 2003. »& Gt;

9. The nerve center
In the photo - the building of the KGB in Moscow. After the collapse of the Soviet system, the service was renamed the FSB. The headquarters of one of the departments, the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) is located in Moscow's Yasenevo.



In the photo - the building of the KGB in Moscow. After the collapse of the Soviet system, the service was renamed the FSB. The headquarters of one of the departments, the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) is located in Moscow's Yasenevo. & Quot; title = «9. The nerve center
In the photo - the building of the KGB in Moscow. After the collapse of the Soviet system, the service was renamed the FSB. The headquarters of one of the departments, the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) is located in Moscow's Yasenevo. »& Gt;

10. Oldrich Ames
A former agent of the CIA counter-intelligence received about 4.6 million dollars from the Soviet Union for their services. After college, Ames went to work for the CIA. He soon ran into financial difficulties - ruinous divorce and second marriage for which he lacked the funds. To pay off debt, he even thought to rob a bank, but found it easier simply by selling state secrets to the KGB. Before he took over the gills in 1994, Ames managed to fail the more than 100 CIA operations.



A former agent of the CIA counter-intelligence received about 4.6 million dollars from the Soviet Union for their services. After college, Ames went to work for the CIA. He soon ran into financial difficulties - ruinous divorce and second marriage for which he lacked the funds. To pay off debt, he even thought to rob a bank, but found it easier simply by selling state secrets to the KGB. Before he took over the gills in 1994, Ames managed to fail the more than 100 CIA operations. & Quot; title = «10. Oldrich Ames
A former agent of the CIA counter-intelligence received about 4.6 million dollars from the Soviet Union for their services. After college, Ames went to work for the CIA. He soon ran into financial difficulties - ruinous divorce and second marriage for which he lacked the funds. To pay off debt, he even thought to rob a bank, but found it easier simply by selling state secrets to the KGB. Before he took over the gills in 1994, Ames managed to fail the more than 100 CIA operations. »& Gt;

11. Robert Hanssen
In the picture - a picture of him in honor of the 20th anniversary of service in the FBI counterintelligence. Hanssen sold to the Soviets in 1979, after only 3 years of service. He continued to transmit sensitive information, even after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Hanssen took the act only in 2001, at the appearance in Virginia. When he was being taken to jail, he asked, "Why are you so long to catch me?»



In the picture - a picture of him in honor of the 20th anniversary of service in the FBI counterintelligence. Hanssen sold to the Soviets in 1979, after only 3 years of service. He continued to transmit sensitive information, even after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Hanssen took the act only in 2001, at the appearance in Virginia. When he was being taken to jail, he asked, "Why are you so long to catch me?» & Quot; title = «11. Robert Hanssen
In the picture - a picture of him in honor of the 20th anniversary of service in the FBI counterintelligence. Hanssen sold to the Soviets in 1979, after only 3 years of service. He continued to transmit sensitive information, even after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Hanssen took the act only in 2001, at the appearance in Virginia. When he was being taken to jail, he asked, "Why are you so long to catch me?» »& Gt;

12. Anna Chapman
Presumably, a member of a group of 11 Russian spies, Chapman is regularly passed on classified information to representatives of the Russian government, and was caught during a raid by the FBI. The ten spies arrested in the US, and another - in Cyprus. They are not charged with espionage, but was charged with money laundering.



Presumably, a member of a group of 11 Russian spies, Chapman is regularly passed on classified information to representatives of the Russian government, and was caught during a raid by the FBI. The ten spies arrested in the US, and another - in Cyprus. They are not charged with espionage, but was charged with money laundering. & quot; title = «12. Anna Chapman
Presumably, a member of a group of 11 Russian spies, Chapman is regularly passed on classified information to representatives of the Russian government, and was caught during a raid by the FBI. The ten spies arrested in the US, and another - in Cyprus. They are not charged with espionage, but was charged with money laundering. "& Gt;

via bigpicture.ru

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