A dangerous journey in the "underworld" of Chongqing (17 photos)

A team of 15 professional cavers, cave explorers and photographers under the auspices of the Society of caves discoverers "Hong Meigu" went on a dangerous journey through uncharted corners of the cave systems Er Wang Dong and Sanvandun within Wulong County of Chongqing city under central authority. It is a world with its own climate, which was formed back in the Ordovician period (ended about 443, 4 ± 1, 5 million years ago). The length of the cave is 42 km, depth - 441 m. They are so huge that there are some clouds, waterfalls, rivers, never before fish and other organisms. The main entrance is located at a depth of 195 m in the sinkholes Niubitsi.

Below is a photo essay Robbie Sean from Manchester, who was one of those who went deep into China for the study of caves.





China. Wulong, Chongqing. The founder of the Society of caves discoverers "Hong Meigu" caver Erin Lynch leads Abromeyta Lars and the team to Niubitsi sinkholes, where the entrance to the cave system Er Wang Dong. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)




China. Wulong, Chongqing. Duncan Collis rises on a small ledge overlooking the sinkholes Niubitsi. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)




China. Wulong, Chongqing. Long vertical dip - the way to the caves. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)




China. Wulong, Chongqing. Erin Lynch insurance checks before descending down into the black abyss. Behind the falls roaring waterfall, scattering spray and wind pumping. This is the entrance to the section of the "Queen of the Nile" cave system Sanvandun. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)




China. Wulong, Chongqing. A huge cave system Sanvandun room - probably the biggest of its kind in the world. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Giant stalagmites at the foot of the slope rising to the next section of the cave system Sanvandun. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. The spectacular natural relief on the ceiling of the cave. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Erin Lynch and Lars Abromeyt trying to wade through flood waters in the section "Queen of the Nile" cave Sanvandun. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Erin Lynch climbs the arch of the cave over an underground waterfall. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Swimming in the underground lake. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. The colorless and eyeless fish. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Matt Ryan examines a giant stalagmite calcite. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Erin Lynch is struggling with the flow, one hand on the rope of salvation. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Duncan Collis and Matt Ryan are crawling through a narrow passage in the section "Where the wind blows" cave system Sanvandun. It is so named because of the strong air currents that carry with them the dust and sand. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Members of the expedition in the section "The troupe of dancing elephants" cave system Sanvandun. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. The underground camp. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)



China. Wulong, Chongqing. Way out. (Robbie Shone / Caters News / ImagineChina)

Tags

See also

New and interesting