Chemical reactions

Chemicals most of us think very well, boring science. It's like a calculation, but instead of numbers - letters. It should be unique crazy to come to the delight of solving mathematical problems with the alphabet.





Mesmerizing bromic acid

According to the science, the Belousov-Zhabotinskii - this "vibrational chemical reaction" in which "ions of transition metals catalyze the oxidation of various commonly organic reductants bromic acid in an acidic aqueous medium", which enables to "observe with the naked eye the formation of complex spatiotemporal structures ". It is a scientific explanation for hypnotic phenomena that occurs if you throw a little bromine in an acidic solution.

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The acid converts the bromine chemical called bromide (which takes on a whole different shade), in turn, bromide is rapidly converted back into bromine, because scientific elves who live within it - too stubborn assholes. The reaction is repeated again and again, allowing you to endlessly watch the undulating movement of the incredible structures.

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Transparent chemical instantly becomes black

Question: What happens when you mix sodium sulfite, citric acid and sodium iodide? The correct answer below:

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When you mix the above ingredients in certain proportions, eventually turns capricious liquid, which initially has a transparent color, and then abruptly turns black. This experiment is called "iodine clock." Simply put, this reaction occurs when the specific components are connected so that their concentration gradually changed. When it reaches a certain threshold - the fluid becomes black.
But that is not all. By varying the proportions of the ingredients you have the opportunity to receive a backlash:

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In addition, using different materials and formulas (for example, as an option - Briggs-Rauscher reaction), you can create a schizophrenic mix that constantly changes color from yellow to blue.

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Creating a plasma in the microwave

Do you want to venture to your friend something interesting, but you do not have access to a pile of obscure chemicals or basic knowledge required in order to mix them safe? Do not despair! All you need for this experiment - a grape, a knife, a glass and a microwave. So, take a grape and cut it in half. One of the pieces of the knife again divide into two parts so that these quarters were related to skin. Put them in the microwave and cover with an inverted glass, turn on the oven. Then step back and watch as aliens abduct the cut berry.

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In fact, what is happening before your eyes - this is one way of creating a very small amount of plasma. From school you know that there are three states of matter: solid, liquid and gaseous. The plasma, in fact, is the fourth type, and is an ionized gas resulting from gas overheating conventional. Grape juice, it turns out, is rich in ions and therefore is one of the best and most accessible means for carrying out simple scientific experiments.

However, be careful, trying to create a plasma in the microwave, as ozone, which is formed inside the glass in large quantities can be toxic!

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Ignition extinct candle smoke trail through

This is a trick you can try to replicate at home without the risk of explosion or the living room of the house. Light a candle. Blow out her and immediately bring your fire to smoke trail. Congratulations: you have got, now you are a true master of fire.

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It turns out that between fire and candle wax there is some love. And this feeling is much stronger than you think. No matter what state the wax - liquid, solid, gaseous - fire still find him, catch up and burn to hell.

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The crystals that glow during crushing

Here is a chemical called tetrakis europium, demonstrating the effect triboluminescence. However, it is better to see once than read a hundred times.

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This effect occurs when the destruction of crystalline solids by converting kinetic energy directly into light.

If you want to see it all with my own eyes, but the hand you do not have europium tetrakis, it does not matter: suit even the most ordinary sugar. Just sit in a dark room, place in a blender a few cubes of sugar and enjoy the beauty of fireworks.

In the XVIII century, when many people thought that scientific phenomena cause ghosts or witches or ghosts of witches, the researchers used this effect to make fun of "mere mortals", chewing in the dark sugar and laughing at those who flee from them as from fire .

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Hell monster emerging from the volcano

Thiocyanate mercury (II) - in the form of an innocent white powder, but it is worth it to burn, it turns into a mythical monster ready to devour you and the world as a whole.

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The second reaction, shown below, is caused by the combustion of ammonium dichromate, which is formed as a result of a miniature volcano.

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Well, what happens if you mix the above two chemicals, and set them on fire? See for yourself.

However, do not try these experiments at home as thiocyanate and mercury (II), and ammonium dichromate is very toxic and when burned can cause serious harm to your health. Take care of yourself!

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Laminar flow

If you mix coffee with milk, you'll have a liquid that you're unlikely to ever again be able to be divided into its constituent components. And this applies to all substances in the liquid state, right? Right. But there is such a thing as a laminar flow. To see the magic in action, simply place a few drops of colored dyes in a transparent vessel with corn syrup and carefully mix everything ...

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... And then mix again at the same pace, but now in the opposite direction.

Laminar flow may occur in any situation and with any type of fluid, but in this case, an unusual phenomenon is due to the viscous properties of corn syrup which, when mixed with dye forming colored layers. So if you just gently and slowly follow the steps in the opposite direction, everything will return to their former places. It looks like a trip back in time!

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Source: muz4in.net

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